The Ranch Review

Animal Abuse on Social Media

Picture+taken+by+Vanessa+Castellon
Picture taken by Vanessa Castellon

Picture taken by Vanessa Castellon

Picture taken by Vanessa Castellon

Abby Galdamez, Staff Reporter

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Among the selfies at the beach and bright delicious food posts one new trend arising on social media is animal abuse. The accounts who post this content are often anonymous or people who do it for the views and likes.  

 The content varies from teenagers harassing and beating animals to death for views and likes to images of the fur trade, meat and dairy industry, and leather manufacturers that usually depict animals being killed, tortured and abused in horrific ways. 

 Cruelty and neglect cross all social and economic boundaries and media reports suggest that animal abuse is common in both rural and urban areas. Images depicting criminal conduct are not illegal to possess, share or distribute according to the first amendment. The action in the content is what is illegal.  

 It is against the law to be cruel to or harm animals in any shape or form, even your own pets. In California, these crimes may be charged as either a misdemeanor or felony, with a punishment of a fine up to $20,000 and/or imprisonment up to 1 year. 

 When people see posts regarding abuse they often try to have post be take down but when this is done the evidence of the crime is removed and the culprit gets away with the cruelty. 

 “I’ve recently seen a lot of spam accounts trying to request me then I go to click and there’s horrible videos of dogs and I automatically report them,” said Liz Palafox, ORHS senior.  

 Your first step is to download or screenshot the images at issue and collect all of the account details that you can, like the account name and other identifiers, the full text of account owner’s posting(s), any captions posted with the images, etc. While most social media sites attempt to remove metadata from uploaded images, downloading the image makes it easier to diagnose whether a still image is authentic or has been Photoshopped in some form. 

 The next step is to report what you have found to the local law enforcement agency where the poster’s account originates (or to your local law enforcement agency if the account does not disclose a location) along with copies of the images and account information you have collected. 

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Animal Abuse on Social Media

    Opinion

    Schools are underfunded. Here’s why

  • Animal Abuse on Social Media

    Opinion

    Why We Need Career Classes

  • Animal Abuse on Social Media

    Opinion

    Why Students Need Career Classes

  • Street Talk

    Street Talk: If you could change one thing about the school, what would it be?

  • Animal Abuse on Social Media

    Arts & Entertainment

    Love, Martin

  • Opinion

    The Impact of Black Panther

  • Animal Abuse on Social Media

    Opinion

    Avatar: The Last Airbender

  • Opinion

    Why People Should Watch March Madness?

  • Animal Abuse on Social Media

    Opinion

    Hydro Flasks

  • Animal Abuse on Social Media

    Opinion

    Cafeteria Food

The Student News Site of Otay Ranch High School
Animal Abuse on Social Media