The Ranch Review

How to Stay Safe During Break

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Picture taken by Vanessa Castellon

Picture taken by Vanessa Castellon

Picture taken by Vanessa Castellon

Elissa Huynh, In Depth Editor

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As students are freed from school for spring break, dangers await in the shadows. Taking measures to stay safe is important.  

 “Teenagers in general tend to be kind of impulsive and they will not always think before they act and sometimes that can lead to injuries and other problems and you have to look out for each other,” said Melanie Kray, assistant principal.  

 Do research. If planning to go somewhere, know the details to be more prepared lowering chances of ending up in unsafe situations or getting lost. Stay alert in unfamiliar environments or places, said Kray. Stick with groups and never leave anyone alone in a strange location. Make sure that parents or someone trustworthy knows your location. 

 Protect eyes and skin. According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, do not swim with contacts since this can lead to pain and infection. Wear sunscreen with at least SPF 15 because excessive and unprotected sun exposure may lead to premature aging, changes in skin texture, and skin cancer. Wear sunglasses for UV ray protection. 

 Avoid alcohol and drugs. Teenagers are minors that should not be drinking anyways, said Kray.  

 According to Addiction Center, drug abuse in teens results in interference in neurotransmitters and damage to connections in the brain, memory problems and more. When teens drink, they increase the risk of delayed puberty, negative effects on their reproductive systems, lower bone mineral density, liver damage and less growth potential. 

 “Make sure you’re making good choices,” said Kray. “Remember you’re not immortal or invincible, so if you’re driving somewhere make sure you’re following the rules of the road.”  

 Think before doing high risk activities. Wear appropriate safety gears for certain activities like seatbelts in the car. According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, accidental injuries kill more Americans in their first 30 years than any other cause of death. 

 With many people traveling over break, securing safety from human trafficking is important even if it seems unlikely. According to the National Human Trafficking Resource Center (NHTRC), some tips include make copies of important documents for yourself and a trusted friend or relative, make sure you have a ticket home in your name and keep it safe and provide a trusted friend or relative with travel information. Ensure the availability to a bank account and money, carry a map and note the locations of places like banks and police departments and know how to access emergency services.  

 “Go to the library and study,” said Kray. “Hang out with your friends. Go to Disneyland. Play sports.” 

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How to Stay Safe During Break